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Toolbox Preview : Training

Flange Inspection Tools      Software

Our free short courses offer general instruction, designed to provide directional overview, rather than specific subject training. The other courses are designed with a mix of online self-study learning modules, moderated tutorials and classroom learning in order to provide the optimal learning experience. We also, in some cases, supply access to additional calculation tools for the student as part of the course.

The goal of this holistic approach is to ensure that the student is offered the best chance to absorb the information and be able to use it in their job. Please check out our course comparison and reviews page for more information about the IES learning difference.

If you are bewildered by the array of courses on offer below, please take the time to assess your training needs on our skills assessment page. In addition, feel free to contact us for information on custom or on-site training courses.

Once you have joined the toolbox, you can pay for access to the online version of the intermediate and advanced courses at this webpage.

Please go back to the main page to access previews of the other sections or to join the toolbox. 

Click on the module titles for a brief description, or download the training brochure here.

Module Module Title Cat.
BFJ1 Leak-Free Operation

BFJ1 - Leak-Free Operation

This module provides an overview of the technical components and the complete life-cycle considerations required to establish an effective joint integrity program. It includes a series of examples demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach and additional guidance on which aspects of the life-cycle that must be considered. On of the main considerations is that simpler solutions are most often the best.

Module Goal: Improve understanding of the technical requirements for a complete lifecycle joint integrity program

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Free
BFJ2 ASME PCC-1-2010

BFJ2 - ASME PCC-1-2010

ASME PCC-1-2010 is the only industry standard that currently addresses requirements for bolted joint assembly. The 2010 revision was a significant improvement and this presentation outlines several of the most useful aspects of the 2010 version; with respect to joint assembly and operation. The presentation is recommended for those not familiar with PCC-1-2010, but will also be of interest to those who are, since some background information is included.

Module Goal: To raise awareness of the useful improvements made to PCC-1-2010

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Free
BFJ3 Flange Design Codes

BFJ3 - Flange Design Codes

In recent years there have been several advances made in the international codes and standards addressing bolted joint design. This module offers a high level assessment of the practical significance of those advances and suggests additional areas for improvement by using supplementary specifications and procedures for bolted joint design.

Module Goal: To provide background and guidance on current code advances, with respect to the practical implications.

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Free
BFJ4 Specs & Procedures

BFJ4 - Specs & Procedures

There is a wide disparity in the treatment of welded joints and bolted joints in pressure vessels and piping. This module examines the differences and uses the comparison to suggest improvements in the way sites handle bolted joint procedures and specifications. Typically current site practices are severely deficient and often confusing, since all requirements are crammed into one document. An improved layout and distribution of information is required in order to ensure the correct information is received by the appropriate individuals.

Module Goal: To provide background as to the level of specifications and procedures that are necessary to properly address bolted joint integrity.

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Free
BFJ5 Prioritization

BFJ5 - Prioritization

The paid course material commences with this module, as it is important to keep in perspective what can be achieved with the available resources. The site resources should be assigned to the actions that will have the greatest impact on bolted joint integrity. Several options are outlined for prioritization of joints and practical considerations for implementation are suggested. The benefits and disadvantages of the different approaches is addressed. Often, simply recognising the approach that is currently being used and being mindful of the implications of that approach is sufficient to help improve joint integrity.

Module Goal: To provide a foundation for building a joint integrity program which can be optimized for a particular site.

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Int.
BFJ6 Joint Terminology

BFJ6 - Joint Terminology

The second paid module contains a definition of standard industry terms relating to bolted joints. This definition of terms is important, as it is required to ensure understanding of the terminology used throughout the training modules. It also provides considerable background for less experienced trainees on bolted joint practices, with an explanation of common practices.

Module Goal: To set the foundation for a common language and to ensure all trainees have a knowledge of joint terminology and common practices.

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Int.
BFJ7 Gasket Selection

BFJ7 - Gasket Selection

Selection of gasket materials and gasket types can have a significant impact on joint integrity. Often, simply changing out the gasket type used and improving site bolt load selection will be sufficient to result in resolution of most site leakage. This module goes through each of the common gasket materials and types, including their limitations, advantages and disadvantages.

Module Goal: To develop the ability of the trainee to select the correct gasket by improving understanding of basic gasket performance

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Int.
BFJ8 Material Selection

BFJ8 - Material Selection

This module outlines the limitations and considerations for material selection of the metal joint components by examining common flange and bolt materials. The module is designed to enable the trainee to understand why a particular flange or bolt material might be used, rather than to enable material selection at the design stage.

Module Goal: To increase awareness of some of the considerations associated with material selection for flanges and bolts.

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Int.
BFJ9 Joint Assembly

BFJ9 - Joint Assembly

This module examines the methods, patterns and procedures that go into establishing a sound joint assembly procedure. Assembly techniques and tools are examined from the perspective of their advantages, disadvantages and necessary considerations. Necessary considerations for joint disassembly and assembly procedures and the effect of bolting patterns are examined. Some of the original test data that was used to justify the inclusion of the new ASME PCC-1-2010 Appendix F assembly procedures are shown, in order to highlight the effect of factors such as the gasket selection, bolt loading procedure and assembly pattern on obtained joint integrity.

Module Goal: To examine the components and considerations that go into establishing a good assembly procedure

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Int.
BFJ10 "Best & Worst Practices"

BFJ10 - "Best & Worst Practices"

This module takes a look at more than 40 "solutions" to joint integrity issues. Some of the solutions are useful, but usually it is important to understand how they actually improve the joint behaviour (or if indeed they do improve it), so that they can be appropriately applied and what the limitations are to the usefulness of the solution. The ongoing theme throughout all of the modules is that simpler is better and many of these solutions fail this basic test. In most cases, there are other, more appropriate and simpler measures that can be taken. In addition, it is essential to understand that some of these solutions will actually make matters worse, if used in the wrong service.

Module Goal: To provide an overview of proposed joint integrity solutions and examine the effectiveness and limitations of each.

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Int.
BFJ11 Flange Design

BFJ11 - Flange Design

This module examines the classic code equations and methods used for flange design in ASME, AS1210, EN13445 and BS5500 based on the Taylor-Forge method. Guidance on the background and considerations necessary for each stage of the design process is provided. In addition, the limitations or approximations of the method are discussed within the context of ensuring a workable flange design, whilst still complying with code requirements. Improvement on the code design method and optimization of the flange design are addressed in a later, advanced level module (BFJ19).

Module Goal: To demonstrate the requirements, considerations and complexities of flange code design.

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Int.
BFJ12 Effects of Pressure

BFJ12 - Effects of Pressure

One of the basic code assumptions is that the bolt load remains constant once assembled. In fact, with the application of pressure and external loads the bolt load may either increase or decrease. This leads to non-conservative designs in the case of the bolt load decreasing. To determine the effect of pressure on the joint and whether the bolt load increases or decreases, it is necessary to examine the joint component flexibility. This module explains this concept and outlines, in general terms, the effect of different component flexibility.

Module Goal: To outline the effects of pressure on joint behaviour, including that the bolt load may increase or decrease, depending on joint component flexibility.

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Int.
BFJ13 Effects of Temperature

BFJ13 - Effects of Temperature

The current flange design codes do not address the effects of temperature on bolted joint behaviour. It can be one of the most significant effects contributing to leakage. This module looks at the mechanical influence of temperature on joint operation during both steady state and transient conditions. The information is relevant to both high temperature and low temperature (cryogenic) applications.

Module Goal: To outline the effects of temperature on joint behaviour, including the effect on bolt load during thermal transients.

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Int.
BFJ14 Specs & Procedures II

BFJ14 - Specs & Procedures II

The previous specification and procedures module looked at what documents were required to ensure joint integrity. This module looks at some of the technical considerations required for writing specifications and procedures. This includes determining the appropriate level of complexity and establishing a sound methodology for developing standard assembly bolt load tables. The calculation method outlined in ASME PCC-1-2010 Appendix O is demonstrated.

Module Goal: To examine the calculations that are required to successfully establish bolt load tables for specifications and procedures

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Int.
BFJ15 Nut Factors

BFJ15 - Nut Factors

Most flanged joints are assembled in the field using torque methods. As such, it is important to understand the amount of friction between the nut and bolt and also the nut and flange or hardened washer. This module looks at the use of the Nut Factor to do this and outlines the variables that affect the Nut Factor in common industrial applications. Nut Factor test data is used to illustrate the relevant concepts and level of variation that should be expected. This includes providing guidelines on the amount of anti-seize that must be applied to the stud in order to ensure accurate assembly bolt load.

Module Goal: To demonstrate the factors that influence the Nut Factor and the level of variance that can typically be expected.

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Int.
BFJ16 RTJ Joints

BFJ16 - RTJ Joints

The use of Ring Type Joint (RTJ) gaskets and RTJ flanges is commonplace in high temperature and high pressure services. The joints come with their own set of peculiarities and limitations that ought to be considered both at the design and the maintenance phases of the joint life cycle. This module outlines the considerations and limitations and includes practical guidance on joint maintenance procedures.

Module Goal: To examine the particular limitations and considerations that must be applied to the use of RTJ joints.

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Int.
BFJ17 Clamped Connectors & Compact Flanges

BFJ17 - Clamped Connectors & Compact Flanges

The use of clamped connectors or compact flanges to replace gasketed joints is relatively commonplace in offshore high temperature and high pressure services. These joints come with their own set of peculiarities and limitations that ought to be considered both at the design and the maintenance phases of the joint life cycle. This module outlines the considerations and limitations and includes practical guidance on joint assembly and maintenance procedures.

Module Goal: To examine the particular limitations and considerations that must be applied to the use of Clamped Connector joints.

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Int.
BFJ18 Leakage

BFJ18 - Leakage

Even with the best joint integrity program, it will take up to ten years to eliminate leakage, due to the time taken to address each problematic joint (since not all of them are opened each turn-around). So, in the interim, the site must have a plan for what to do if a joint leaks. This module outlines a series of appropriate actions that can be taken. It looks at the limitations and effectiveness of each of the options in order to enable the trainee to determine the most appropriate course of action.

Module Goal: Provide guidance on the appropriate actions to mitigate joint leakage, should it occur.

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Int.
BFJ19 Design Optimization

BFJ19 - Design Optimization

The previous module on flange design outlined standard code calculations. This module extends the code calculations by providing pointers on optimization of flange design. In addition, it explains how to extend the basic code flange design method to include advanced assessment methods that ensure leak free joint operation.

Module Goal: To provide advanced knowledge of flange design in order to ensure leak free joint operation for newly designed equipment.

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Adv.
BFJ20 Pressure & Thermal II

BFJ20 - Pressure & Thermal II

This module extends on the previous thermal and pressure effect modules by providing advanced calculation methods to determine the effect of those loads on the operational gasket stress. The calculations include the use of mechanical interaction equations for determining the effect of pressure and the determination of thermal effects using the methodology outlined in Welding Research Council Bulletin 510.

Module Goal: To provide the calculation methods and guidance for the determination of the effects of pressure and temperature.

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Adv.
BFJ21 Joint Component Limits

BFJ21 - Joint Component Limits

One of the most critical aspects in determining the acceptable assembly bolt load and also in examining the root cause of leakage is to determine the strength of the joint components. This modules outlines the method for determining the strength of the joint components and provides guidance on the aspects that must be considered. The module includes reference to much of the original work that went into the development of ASME PCC-1-2010 and Welding Research Council Bulletin 538.

Module Goal: To demonstrate the methods for determining joint component strength

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Adv.
BFJ22 Bolt Load Selection

BFJ22 - Bolt Load Selection

This module outlines the methods and considerations for determining the correct assembly bolt load for non-standard (custom) flanges. This includes pressure vessel, heat exchangers and non-standard piping joints. The method used is that outlined in ASME PCC-1-2010 Appendix O and Welding Research Council bulletin 538, but is extended to cover other considerations, such as the accuracy of the joint assembly procedure. Recommendations on appropriate gasket stress levels are provided such that the trainee may apply the calculations immediately to eliminate leakage.

Module Goal: To provide a method for the determination of the appropriate assembly bolt load for any joint.

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Adv.
BFJ23 Piping Moments

BFJ23 - Piping Moments

This module covers the determination of the effect of external loads on joint operation. It examines historic research on the subject and uses that to justify acceptable methodologies for dealing with external loads for both piping design and pressure vessel design. The assessment uses the previously outlined joint mechanical interaction method to vastly improve on current industry methods, such as those outlined in ASME design codes and typical piping methods such as the Equivalent Pressure method. In addition, the effect of external loads with joints operating at elevated temperatures (creep) is discussed.

Module Goal: To provide calculation methods and guidance on assessing the effects of external loads on bolted joints.

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Adv.
BFJ24 Creep/Relaxation

BFJ24 - Creep/Relaxation

A significant contributor to joint leakage in high temperature joints is component creep/relaxation. The effects of relaxation in metal commence at relatively low temperatures of around 200°C (400°F) and therefore it can be a significant effect on joints operating at temperatures much higher than that. This module outlines the most effective methods for assessing the effect of creep/relaxation. The methods can be used at the design stage (materials selection) and also the operational stage to investigate the root cause of leakage.

Module Goal: To provide a method of determining the approximate effect of creep/relaxation on joint operation.

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Adv.
BFJ25 Troubleshooting

BFJ25 - Troubleshooting

An important part of any joint integrity program is learning from mistakes (leakage). In order to do that, it is necessary to establish an standardized failure assessment methodology that will identify both the root cause and also any secondary contributing factors. Typically, root cause assessments on bolted joints are primarily focussed only on one contributing factor (the final one that resulted in leakage), whereas often there are larger, more systematic problems that have had a more significant contribution to the leakage. This module draws on previous modules to establish a systematic methodology for approaching root cause analysis of joint leakage. This allows a program of continuous improvement to be implemented into the joint integrity program.

Module Goal: To demonstrate a systematic approach to the assessment of the contributing factors to joint leakage.

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Adv.
BFJ26 FEA on Joints

BFJ26 - FEA on Joints

Finite Element Analysis of Bolted Joints is often used at the design and leakage investigation stages. However, it is relatively easy to perform FEA of bolted joints incorrectly. Unfortunately it is not always easy to identify any errors in the analysis simply by reviewing the results. This module outlines guidelines for performing FEA on bolted joints and provides cautions as to when FEA is appropriate and what steps must be taken to verify the results. The module is written primarily to assist end-users in reviewing FEA reports on bolted joint design and leakage.

Module Goal: To outline typical FEA errors, best FEA practices and suggested FEA verification methods.

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Adv.
BFJ27 Joint Maintenance

BFJ27 - Joint Maintenance

Bolted joints, and in particular those that are frequently disassembled or that are in corrosive service, will require periodic maintenance in order to ensure that the joint continues to operate leak free. This module examines some typical maintenance activities and outlines the required areas of consideration for ensuring that the maintenance activity is executed successfully.

Module Goal: To provide guidance on typical maintenance activities for bolted joints.

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Adv.

 

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